T cell immunity to chronic infection, co-infection and immunotherapy


During our October 16 conference, we will welcome David G. Brooks, a Senior Scientist and the Scotiabank Chair in Inflammation Research in the Tumor Immunotherapy Program at the Princess Margaret Cancer Center (PMCC). He is also a professor a Professor in the Department of Immunology, Faculty of Medicine at the University of Toronto. 

Unlike most infections, the immune response against chronically replicating viruses rapidly becomes dysfunctional. Therapeutic antibody blockade of the inhibitory PD1:PDL1 pathway can enhance T cell function, yet the mechanisms by which this therapy reshapes the immune environment still remains ill defined. I will discuss our studies identifying new responsive T cell subsets that enable viral control and their molecular pathways induced by anti-PDL1 therapy.  Further, how the immune dysfunctions in chronic infections spread to foster co-infections is not well understood. I will further discuss the complex inflammatory and suppressive changes in the immune environment during chronic viral infections that promote Mycobacterium tuberculosis co-infection. 
 


FRIDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2020 – 12 P.M. TO 1 P.M. 

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Dr. David Brooks is a Senior Scientist and the Scotiabank Chair in Inflammation Research in the Tumor Immunotherapy Program at the Princess Margaret Cancer Center (PMCC), and a Professor in the Department of Immunology, Faculty of Medicine at the University of Toronto.  Before joining PMCC, Dr. Brooks was a tenured Associate Professor and led a laboratory at University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) for seven years. Dr. Brooks did his post-doctoral fellowship with Dr. Michael Oldstone at The Scripps Research Institute in San Diego, California studying the immune response to persistent virus infection. Dr. Brooks earned his Ph.D. from UCLA under the mentorship of Dr. Jerome Zack, studying HIV latency and therapeutic strategies to reactivate the latent virus. Dr. Brooks earned his B.S. in Molecular and Cellular Biology from the University of Arizona. He was born and raised in Venice, California. 


Invited by Daniel Kaufmann
Immunopathology theme

 

We look forward to seeing you connected in large numbers!
 


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The CRCHUM Conferences are free weekly meetings featuring renowned scientific speakers from various disciplines. 

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